BrillMedia.co

Dynamic Creative In Political Advertising

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Dynamic creative is going to be a big part of the 2020 election process.

Politics, am I right? Political advertising is going to heavily rely on dynamic creative to reach audiences with contextually relevant messages to potential voters.

Whichever side of the aisle you’re on, however you vote, and however you think about various political topics there is one important thing to learn from political advertisers if you are a marketer: expect to see a great array of customized and dynamic ad creative from political advertisers.

I saw these ads in my Facebook feed.

It’s January 30th and the SuperBowl is happening this weekend. Now is the time for contextual imagery related to football.

These ads are delivered using Facebook’s dynamic creative option, which mixes text, headline, images, and calls to action into varying combinations.

There are five elements here that are changing

Imagery

In these two political ads the images are different. One uses a more diffused background and one is more clear. Both show different angles inside a football stadium. Much more notably for me is the text within the image. Both use the same copy “Mike’s Message Is Too Important To Wait”, but the colors in the images are different. I find the colors to be the most prominent differences in the creative. Also, you’ll note that Mike is placed differently in each message. He’s in the same stance, but in one he’s on the left, and in one he’s on the right. One ad gives off a more optimistic vibe, with the day time view of the football field. One seems a bit more dramatic with the night time view of the football field. This dramaticism may be purely a perceptual view, showing my own personal biases, but it’s possible that dark and dramatic speaks to the heavy importance of the message, whereas the daytime view of the football field may be set to communicate a much more positive and optimistic view. 

Main Text

One ad uses a call to action in the text with “Click here to join.” The creative goes on to say “Be among the first to see the ad.”

Headline and Link Copy

Both executions use the same copy in these fields.

Call To Action

Both use the same call to action – Learn More. 

If you want to explore more of these ads click this link to go to Facebook’s Ad Library, which is a great tool to explore creative executions from your favorite advertisers. 

When baseball season starts expect to see similar imagery contextualized for the start of MLB. This is a great opportunity to break through to voters and align with their interests at the moment.

Marketers have the ability to deploy this type of contextual creative in three ways on Facebook and Instagram, and with banners.

Dynamic Remarketing

Let’s move off political advertising and look at use cases for other types of advertisers. Use a data feed to deploy creative based on individual pages users have run in the past. For example, people who recently abandoned a cart see a different ad then people who are browsing for a product for the first time. First time viewers may see a full price product. Cart abandoned users see 10% off.

Randomized Top Performing Executions

Develop ad creative for audiences and randomize the ad delivery. In this case the creative delivery logic is about taking a pool of users and understanding the creative executions that resonate most with the audience. For example, if create 15 has a higher click through rate than creative 58, then more ad delivery will run to

Sequential Storytelling

Create a sequence of ads to deliver to users at different frequency points throughout the campaign. At frequency 1-2 the user gets creative A. At frequency 3-5 the user gets creative B. At frequency 6-8 the user gets creative C. This is an opportunity for ad spaces to be the forum for storytelling through advertising.

I’ll be paying attention to the variety of political advertising messages in the 2020 election cycle as candidates seek to sway public opinion.

Robert Brill

Robert is the CEO of BrillMedia.co, host of the LA Business Podcast, and host of The Great Reset on YouTube.

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